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TCC Tuesday Tidbits Issue 405

The function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers.
Ralph Nader

IT Security Tip #15: Set up Bank Alerts – NOW!

Here’s a tip that just might save your bacon: set up withdrawal alerts on your bank accounts. Many banks will send you an e-mail alert whenever money is withdrawn from your account via check, debit card or transfer. Setting up those alerts will allow you to spot and report fraudulent activity BEFORE the money has already been siphoned into a cybercriminal’s hands.

Office Tips & Tricks: Word Chat While You Edit

Collaborate with co-authors without leaving Word. Save your document to the cloud to get started. Available in Excel and PowerPoint too.

Keyboard Keys

Shortcut of the Week

The Problem Steps Recorder is a feature that allows a user to walk someone else through a problem they can’t describe with words. The user can record all of the keystrokes and windows the user is seeing that led up to the error or problem.

  1. Click Start or press the Windows Key
  2. Type Problems Steps Recorder or PSR
  3. Click on the program and then go to the first step or first page you are having a problem with
  4. Click Start Record on Problems Steps Recorder to begin capturing your process or flow to get to the error message
  5. Press Stop Record once you’ve gotten your error message
  6. Click Save to name the recording and now you have a visual you can send to someone else to help you remotely troubleshoot your issue

Have an unfortunate co-worker that’s not getting a copy of the TCC Tuesday Tidbits? Forward them your copy. Or, better yet, have them sign up at http://computer-center.com/tidbits/

Submit your TCC Tuesday Tidbit requests and ideas to me by calling (608) 755-1524.

Sincerely,

James Pearson, President The Computer Center 39 S. Main St. – Upper Janesville, WI 53545 (608) 755-1524

TCC Tuesday Tidbits Issue 404

Business has only two functions – marketing and innovation.
Peter Drucker

IT Security Tip #14: Work Computers and Devices are Only for ONE Thing…

That is, WORK! Never mix personal web surfing and social media with company devices. If you want to check your Hotmail account or Facebook page, do it during your lunch break and on YOUR personal devices. Over 600,000 Facebook accounts are hacked every day. If you’re using a company device to access a compromised account, you’re opening up a door to a hacker who can get into your company’s network via your e-mail or PC. Bottom line, don’t use company PCs, devices, phones or Internet for PERSONAL use.

Office Tips & Tricks: Word and Outlook Read to You

Let Word and Outlook read your documents and email message aloud. Text is highlighted as its read.

In Word, open a document and select Review > Read Aloud. In Outlook, select a message and click Home > Read Aloud.

Keyboard Keys

Shortcut of the Week

Want a quick way to move a window from one monitor to the other in a dual monitor setup without having to drag the window with the mouse? Use the Windows Key + SHIFT + Arrow Key. Simply press and hold the Windows key, then add and hold the SHIFT key. While keeping those two pressed hit the left or right arrow to move the current active window left or right.

Have an unfortunate co-worker that’s not getting a copy of the TCC Tuesday Tidbits? Forward them your copy. Or, better yet, have them sign up at http://computer-center.com/tidbits/

Submit your TCC Tuesday Tidbit requests and ideas to me by calling (608) 755-1524.

Sincerely,

James Pearson, President The Computer Center 39 S. Main St. – Upper Janesville, WI 53545 (608) 755-1524

TCC Tuesday Tidbits Issue 403

The past does not equal the future unless you live there.
Tony Robbins

IT Security Tip #13: DON’T use Public WiFi Until you Read This

We’re all guilty of it: connecting to free public WiFi. Whether it’s at the coffee shop, hotel or airport, the temptation to check e-mail and surf the web is just too strong to resist. So BEFORE you connect to any free, public WiFi, make sure the connection is legitimate.

It’s not uncommon for hackers to set up fake clones of public WiFi access points to try and get you to connect to THEIR WiFi over the legitimate, safe public one being made available to you. Before connecting, check with an employee of the store or location to verify the name of the WiFi they are providing. Next, NEVER access financial, medical or other sensitive data while on public WiFi. Also, don’t shop online and enter your credit card information unless you’re absolutely certain the connection point you’re on is safe and secure.

Microsoft Teams: Stay in the Loop With Activity Alerts

The Activity tab notifies you when somebody @mentions you or directly interacts with a message or conversation you’ve started.

It also shows you any channel activity for which you’ve turned on notifications in Settings.

The number on the Activity bell indicates how many alerts you have waiting.

You’ll find the Activity tab at the top of the navigation pane on the left.

Keyboard Keys

Shortcut of the Week

Have more than one window and would like to split view two windows on the same screen? EASY! Simply select the window you would like to move first and while holding down the Windows key on your keyboard, press either the Left or Right arrow to snap it to either the left or right side of the screen. If you have 3 or more windows you would like displayed, then when you hold down the Windows key + Left or Right Arrow, also use the up or down arrow to then move the window to the upper or lower 1/4 of the screen. See image below as an example of the finished result.

Have an unfortunate co-worker that’s not getting a copy of the TCC Tuesday Tidbits? Forward them your copy. Or, better yet, have them sign up at http://computer-center.com/tidbits/

Submit your TCC Tuesday Tidbit requests and ideas to me by calling (608) 755-1524.

Sincerely,

James Pearson, President The Computer Center 39 S. Main St. – Upper Janesville, WI 53545 (608) 755-1524

Natural Disasters Destroy – Cloud Data Safe?

Natural Disasters Destroy – Cloud Data Safe?

Natural Disasters Can Destroy, But Your Data Is Safe If It’s In The Cloud. This past hurricane season has brought some of the most harrowing, widespread destruction the southeastern United States has ever been forced to weather. But, despite the enormous, tragic cost of these natural disasters, the people of these communities persevere. In the wake of widespread wind damage and flooding, communities have banded together. Thousands of volunteers and neighbors are working as one to rebuild and find the way forward. There is no doubt, however, that the havoc wreaked by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma will produce aftershocks that will echo through affected areas for decades.

To anyone who turtled up in their attic in the middle of the storm or just saw a picture of the wreckage in the news after the hurricanes departed, the physical damage caused by the storm is obvious. What’s less obvious is the effect these storms have on the futures of the survivors, the reverberating impact that cuts thousands of life plans short and forces individuals to completely change their course in a cruel reversal of fate.

“Forty percent of small businesses don’t survive these events,” said Russel Honore, the previous Joint Task Force commander for Hurricane Katrina. The electrical grid is knocked out for days, and businesses are forced to close the office for what they hope is a temporary period due to flooding.

Each day that a business can’t provide service, it’s bleeding money — a cost that many businesses, especially the little guys, can’t absorb. So, they close for good, their buildings go up for lease and those who were once the heads of promising young businesses are now unemployed, in the market for a job in a city up to its neck in water.

Just as common is a business that finds its central data structures wiped out by physical damage. Following a hurricane, most businesses near the storm should have little trouble cleaning up and remodeling following nasty flooding, but if their servers, computers and network infrastructure have been wiped out, it’s a completely a different story.

Oftentimes, a catastrophic loss of data will shutter a business for good. A 2010 report by technology research firm Gartner Group stated that 43 percent of businesses went belly-up almost immediately after a “major loss” of data, while 51% shut down within just two years. That leaves a measly 6% survival rate for businesses that suffer company-wide data loss.

These are scary numbers, to be sure, but there is good news: Businesses that migrate their data to the cloud are at significantly less risk of losing vital data. This is not only because your typical cloud service will back up your up-to-date data with several levels of redundancy, but because most cloud services are actually more secure than their on-site counterparts in general.

And make no mistake, businesses with on-site data are susceptible to loss far beyond physical disasters like hurricanes, flooding, earthquakes or solar flares. Don’t forget the risks disgruntled employees, freak accidents and, especially, hackers pose to your precious data. While it’s true that all of these risks still exist with cloud-based services, they’re much reduced. A 2012 Alert Logic report stated that “on-premises environment users actually suffer more [hacking] incidents” than cloud-based users, while also being subjected to “significantly more brute force attacks.” When you think about it, this makes sense. With your entire system backed up on a number of off-site locations, it’s much more difficult for hackers to encrypt the entirety of your data and hold it for ransom.

That said, not every business absolutely needs the cloud to stay secure. Certain business models need on-site structures for various reasons, and a few find it more cost-effective. Still, the cloud is definitely something that any savvy business owner needs to examine closely as a potential option. It could mean the difference between flourishing in the next fiscal quarter and going under.

TCC Tuesday Tidbits Issue 402

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.
Steve Jobs

IT Security Tip #12: The DANGERS of Dropbox and Other File Sync Apps

If you’re using Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive or other consumer-grade file sync and sharing cloud applications, listen up! These applications pose a huge threat to your company because company data can be spread far and wide without central oversight of what information is being shared with whom. Further, over 7 MILLION Dropbox accounts have been hacked, giving cybercriminals a path into the company’s network.

This is even MORE important if your company has access to and/or stores financial, medical or other sensitive data. Using file-sharing applications like these are a clear and direct violation of data breach and compliance laws. Bottom line, DON’T USE THEM FOR COMPANY DATA and use only company-approved, business-grade file-sharing applications.

Microsoft Teams: Connect Your Team to the World with Connectors

Did you know you can set up a Twitter feed for your Team? And many other services, too, including Trello, GitHub, Bing News, and more. With Office 365 Connectors, it’s easy to connect many of your favorite apps and services. Here’s how:

  1. Right-click the channel you want to add a connector to.
  2. Select Connectors.
  3. Search for the connector(s) you want to add to the channel.
  4. Click Add, and follow the prompts.

Keyboard Keys

Shortcut of the Week

Forgot to bookmark a web page you once visited? Don’t fret! Quickly find your site by searching your browser history. Press Ctrl + H or Command + H on a mac to open the browser’s history. Once there, type a keyword that you remember about that page.

Tech Corner

A security vulnerability in one of the world’s most commonly used enterprise video conferencing tools could have allowed hackers to eavesdrop on private business meetings. researchers at cybersecurity company Check Point found it was possible to exploit the way Zoom generated URLs for virtual conference rooms and use this to eavesdrop on meetings. By using automated tools to generate random meeting room IDs, researchers found that they could generate links to genuine Zoom meetings without password protection 4% of the time during tests. In order to counter the potential for cyber criminals exploiting any form of teleconferencing software by using any potential vulnerabilities in other platforms, it’s recommended that businesses ensure that calls are password protected.”

Have an unfortunate co-worker that’s not getting a copy of the TCC Tuesday Tidbits? Forward them your copy. Or, better yet, have them sign up at http://computer-center.com/tidbits/

Submit your TCC Tuesday Tidbit requests and ideas to me by calling (608) 755-1524.

Sincerely,

James Pearson, President The Computer Center 39 S. Main St. – Upper Janesville, WI 53545 (608) 755-1524

TCC Tuesday Tidbits Issue 401

The only way around is through.
Robert Frost

IT Security Tip #11: What to do BEFORE you go to Starbucks

So you’re in the car on the way home from Starbucks, basking in the glow of consuming your triple-shot, low-foam, extra-hot pumpkin-spice latte when you suddenly realize your laptop has gone missing. You drive back like the caffeinated lunatic you are, only to discover no one has turned it in. What do you do? That depends on what precautions you have (or haven’t!) taken.

First, if you’ve properly encrypted your data, password-protected the access to your device and shut down and logged off all key applications, you’ve got a bit more time to respond. But the first thing to do, whether or not you’ve taken those precautionary measures, is to notify your IT department (us) that you’ve lost your device. That will allow us to change passwords and lock access to applications and data a thief may gain access to via your unprotected laptop. We can also remotely wipe your device to make sure no one will be able to gain access to the data stored on your computer. (Which is also why it’s CRITICAL to back up your data on a daily basis!)

Next, change ALL the passwords to every website you log in to, starting with any sites that contain financial data (your bank account) or company data. If your laptop contained medical records, financial information or other sensitive data (like social security numbers, birthdays, etc.), then you need to contact a qualified attorney to understand what you may be required to do by law to notify individuals who may be affected.

Quite simply, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure; so make sure you’re engaging us to encrypt and back up your data, as well as put remote monitoring software on all mobile devices. Put a pin-code lock or password requirement to access a device after 10 minutes of inactivity, and get into the habit of logging out of websites when you’re done using them.

Microsoft Teams: Keep Communication Fuss Free – Title Your Chats

Use a subject line to make your topic stand out and help you search for it later.

To add a subject, select the formatting button (it looks like an “A” with a pen) and add a title in the Subject line. Type your message and press Enter to post your new conversation.

Keyboard Keys

Shortcut of the Week

Create tables in Microsoft Word by typing a plus (+) to start the table and tab until you want the table cell or table to end. Hit Enter at the end and an empty table will appear.

Jason’s Tech Corner

Submitted by Jason Risner – Solutions Engineer, The Computer Center

Big Microsoft data breach – 250 million records exposed and what to do.

Have an unfortunate co-worker that’s not getting a copy of the TCC Tuesday Tidbits? Forward them your copy. Or, better yet, have them sign up at http://computer-center.com/tidbits/

Submit your TCC Tuesday Tidbit requests and ideas to me by calling (608) 755-1524.

Sincerely,

James Pearson, President The Computer Center 39 S. Main St. – Upper Janesville, WI 53545 (608) 755-1524

TCC Tuesday Tidbits Issue 400

Yesterday’s home runs don’t win today’s games.
Babe Ruth

IT Security Tip #10: REMOVE that unwanted freeware

Like it or not, PC manufacturers LOVE to stuff your brand-new PC full of “free” applications (they get paid to do it, so you’ve got a slim chance of getting one without a side of spamware). But clutter is the enemy of a speedy PC, and if you’re not using a particular software on a regular basis, it’s best to REMOVE it completely. That way you don’t have it sucking up processing speed AND leaving the door open to hackers and malware.

Microsoft Teams: Take Your Team With You

The Teams mobile app helps you connect and collaborate wherever you are.

The app is available on iOS and Android. Participate in conversations, join meetings on the go, and access all of your teams, channels, files, and more.

Keyboard Keys

Shortcut of the Week

If you have multiple instances of a program open, press and hold down the Ctrl key while clicking the icon for that program to cycle through each windows for that program.

Jason’s Tech Corner

Submitted by Jason Risner – Solutions Engineer, The Computer Center

Facebook has partnerships with retailers that allow it to learn about what users are buying, both online and in brick-and-mortar locations. This allows Facebook to target advertising to people based on the things that they are known to spend money on. Click the link to find out how you can opt out.

Have an unfortunate co-worker that’s not getting a copy of the TCC Tuesday Tidbits? Forward them your copy. Or, better yet, have them sign up at http://computer-center.com/tidbits/

Submit your TCC Tuesday Tidbit requests and ideas to me by calling (608) 755-1524.

Sincerely,

James Pearson, President The Computer Center 39 S. Main St. – Upper Janesville, WI 53545 (608) 755-1524